Albion, Art, Books, mythology, Stuart France

The House that Fish Built: Cave of Cruachan…

*

…So the heroes of Albion set out for the Cave of Cruachan…

Through the Gap-of-the-Watch,

over the Plain-of-Two-Forks,

across the Ford-of-the-Morrigan

into the Rowan-Meadow-of-the-Two-Oxen

by the Meeting-of-the-Four-Ways they drove

before a dim, dark, heavy mist overtook them…

*

In the Cave of Cruachan, Very-White-Clear-Sight sat in meditation, “Mother,” she said, “I see a chariot coming over the plain.”

“Describe it,” said Sweet-Mouthed Maeve.

Said Very-White, “truly, I see horses pulling the chariot:

two stormy dappled greys

alike in colour and shape;

nostrils wide

heads erect

ears pricked;

manes flowing

of full slim-girth

their tails curled;

galloping side by side

bounding apace

they career along.

*

A chariot of fine wood,

the high frame’s wicker-work

creaks above its two black wheels:

its curved yoke is silver mounted.

*

In the chariot

a dark, melancholy man:

his eyebrows jet

his face pale

cheeks ruddy;

his blue mantle is

held across the chest

by a salmon brooch.

A three-pronged javelin

gleams from his shoulder.

An awning of bird plumage

waves from his chariot frame…

*

…“I recognise that man,” said Maeve,

“an ocean fury:

a whale that rages in the crash of battle,

like the back-stroke of waves against the land;

in face a man

in mien a hero

in heart a dragon;

swift, as the speckled trout

on sand stone is cut, the red

hand of Connor Cruel-Crest…

*

7 thoughts on “The House that Fish Built: Cave of Cruachan…”

  1. Very nicely done. Reminds me of reading ancient works. Things translated from long dead storytellers through several generations. I believe I can hear a gong sounded in the mists of time with this one.

    Liked by 3 people

  2. There is something about this ancient tale that held me spellbound, waiting for the man in the chariot to come closer and wondering what he might be about to do, or what these two might be about to undergo. Great retelling. LOVE these ancient tales.

    Liked by 2 people

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