Art, Books

God-Man…

geometries 137*

…“But the Angles were a British tribe, right? And the Saxons were German?”

We are back in Wen’s study after the half triumph of the first of our Glastonbury talks, which aside from a few timing problems, went as well as could have been expected in view of the weather and the somewhat intricate complications of the run up.

“No, that’s not right either; both the Saxons and the Angles were Germanic tribes.”

“Our country is now named after a Germanic tribe! I think we need to know more about the Anglo-Saxons and the original Britons who could, perhaps, be more or less synonymous with what we now like to call the Celts.”

“As you may have already surmised my sense of history is somewhat sketchy at the best of times but in relation to the Anglo-Saxons and what went before it is practically non-existent.”

“That’s hardly surprising. Much of their contribution to these lands was conveniently forgotten after 1066, for obvious reasons.”

“Well, they certainly seem to have got the proportions of their churches spot on at least for the smaller sites. There is an Irish reference to the coming of Christ in one of the Conchobar stories, something about a ball being shaken loose from his head and killing him. He was also regarded as a sort of giant if memory serves. I had always assumed that the story, or at least that particular aspect of it, was merely a monkish interpolation.”

Wen is checking something in the Dictionary, “Get this… ‘Ætheling from O.E . . . . Æpling, ‘son of a king, man of royal blood, nobleman, chief, prince, king, Christ, God-Man, Hero, Saint…’

“Wait a minute… wait a minute… give me that last bit again.”

“…Christ, God-Man, Hero, Saint…”

“Didn’t we call our Arthur, Aeth in, ‘The Heart of Albion’?”

“We did.”

“And didn’t we set his story in Mercia?”

“We did.”

“And didn’t Mercia grow to become the largest and most powerful Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Albion at one point in its history?”

“It did indeed.”

“Well, that’s it then…The Anglo Saxon kings were claiming divine descent.”

“…Along with most other European kings at that time no doubt.”

“That’s true, but the Anglo-Saxon kings’ descent wasn’t from God it was from Christ.”

“And how did they get there?”

“They got there from their very own High One who also hung from a tree with a spear in his side… shrieking.”

“Odin!”

“They evidently regarded Christ as an avatar of Odin.”

“Blimey, you’ll not read that in any history book!”

“Just as well we’re not writing a history then isn’t it?”

The Aetheling Thing

5 thoughts on “God-Man…”

  1. I think defining Angles as “English” and “Saxons” were German makes a presumption that there were real nations then. I think it was more like tribes that live here and there. I don’t think there were really NATIONS until you get to around 1000 BCE. That was just the beginning of tribes and “groups” coming together and consolidating. I think the Black Plague and the Hundred Years War and similar internal struggles formalized centralization. Back in these really early periods, I don’t think there were real borders as we understand them today. It was tribal and there were a lot of places that were not even as well defined as a tribal group. They were just settlements without much identity. I could be wrong, but I think we try to attach current reality to the past and it doesn’t really work.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply to Marilyn Armstrong Cancel reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.