Books, Philosophy, symbolism, Trickster

Odin’s Steed…

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We have to travel far and wide before we can comprehend this story,

but in psychological terms ‘Loki’ is straightforward enough.

He represents the shadow side of the personality.

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In the Myth Cycle as a whole,

Loki’s binding brings on the destruction of the world,

but at this stage of the story he is introduced to us in all his ‘glory’.

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Given free rein in this way, Loki advocates a hazardous

solution to a seemingly insurmountable problem for the Gods.

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When this looks like going awry he manages to save the day,

 and brings a much needed boon to the Nine Worlds,

in the wake of a costly transgression of oath.

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‘Solemn oaths were broken

word and bond

and binding pledges

which had passed between them.’

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The shattering of the Rock Giant’s skull,

after he has previously been granted safe passage in Asgard,

reflects the, potentially, ‘Qliphothic’ shattering of the personality at transition.

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To claim Loki is misunderstood, or undersold in these stories,

would be an understatement!

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This myth also appears slightly disingenuous

when it states that Loki stayed away from Asgard, ‘for some time’.

As the gestation period of a mare lasts between eleven and twelve months

the information given here could, perhaps, have been more pertinent.

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The colt which Loki bears and then gifts to Odin can be identified

by returning its description to a riddle form.

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What is grey, can out pace all other earth-bound steeds,

can move over the sea, and through the air, and uses its eight ‘legs’,

or phases, as it traverses the night, into day?

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The answer is, the Moon…

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As a ‘heavenly steed’ the moon

is even swifter than the sun,

covering the same distance in one month,

as the sun covers in a year.

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Looked at in this way, the story has far more antiquity

than initially meets the eye.